Brain Sports Edutainment

อบรมเชิงปฏิบัติการ Child's Coach "นวัตกรรมพัฒนาสติปัญญา 8 ด้าน"

Brain Sports Edutainment

อบรมเชิงปฏิบัติการ Child's Coach "นวัตกรรมพัฒนาสติปัญญา 8 ด้าน"

Motor Skill Activity Development on Zenith Child Ability

                                                   Dr.Thana Kitisrivorapan

IMotor Skill Fundamental motor skills, such as the catch, overhand throw, run and leap, form the building blocks which underpin the learning of more complicated sport and movement skills common to the community. Without fundamental motor skill competence, students are less likely to learn related sport and movement skills. Fundamental motor skill competence has been shown to influence students in many ways. Students who have achieved fundamental motor skill competence have been found to successfully participate in a range of sports and movement activities and maintain involvement during childhood and adolescence. Regular involvement in sport and movement activities lead to gains in health-related physical fitness. How students feel about themselves can be influenced by their physical skills. Students who have achieved fundamental motor skill competence have been found to perceive themselves as being competent, socially accepted and to have a positive attitude towards physical activity. In essence, fundamental motor skill competence assists in preparing students for a healthy lifestyle. The role of physical education in the school curriculum is to help students develop the competencies and beliefs necessary for incorporating regular physical activity into their lives. Through involvement in a well-taught physical education program, students can achieve physical and personal benefits. An important part of a comprehensive physical education program is instruction in fundamental motor skills. Fundamental Motor Skills and Their Components Synapse How Meditation Can Reshape Our Brains: Dr.Sara W. Lazar atTEDxCambridge 2011.(Online) Available: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H234h6wJ7LA ………So I thought, oh, well, this is a great way that I can stretch, but also remain in shape, and maybe I could even still run the Boston Marathon. So I went to the yoga class and I really enjoyed it, except when the teacher would make all sorts of claims, you know, all sorts of medical claims, but also claims about, oh, yes, it will help you...You'll increase your compassion and open your heart and I was just like...I remember my eyes would roll and...I think, yeah, yeah, yeah, I am here to stretch. But what was interesting was that after a couple of weeks I started noticing some of these changes, I started noticing that I was calmer and I was better able to handle difficult situations, and indeed, I was feeling more compassionate and open-hearted towards other people, and I was better able to see things from other people's point of view. And, you know, I was like, hm, how could this be,how could this be? And, I thought, well maybe, you know, it's just a placebo response, right? She told me I will feel this, so maybe that's why I was feeling it. So I decided to do a literature search to see if there's any research on this. And low and behold, there was quite a bit showing both yoga and meditation are extremely effective for decreasing stress they're also very good for reducing symptoms associated with numerous diseases including depression, anxiety, pain, and insomnia. And there's a couple of very good studies demonstrating it can actually improve your ability to pay attention, and most interestingly, I thought virtually every study has shown that people are just happier. They report they're more satisfied with their life, and they have a higher quality of life. And so, this was interesting to me. And so I decided to switch and start doing this sort of research. So as a nurse scientists, you know, how could this be happening? How can something as silly as a yoga posture or sitting and watching your breath. How can that lead to all these sorts of different types of changes? So, what we know is that whenever you engage in a behavior over and over again, that this can lead to changes in your brain. And this is what's referred to as neuroplasticity. And what this just means is that your brain is plastic and that the neurons can change how they talk to each other with experience. And so, there's a couple of studies demonstrating that you can actually detect this, using machines like the MRI machine.The first study was with juggling.They took people who had never ever juggled before, and they scanned them, and then they taught them how to juggle, and they said, "Keep practising for three months." And they brought them back after three months, and they scanned them the second time, and they found that they can actually detect with the MRI machine changes in the amount of grey matter in the brain of these people in areas that are important for detecting visual motion. So, I thought, OK, three months, you know...Can meditation change brain structure too? Something as simple as, you know, as juggling.What about meditation? So the first study we did, we recruited a bunch of people from the Boston area, and these were not monks or meditation teachers, they're just average Joes who on average practice meditationabout 30-40 minutes a day, and we put them in a scanner, and we compared them to a group of people who were demographically matched, but who don't meditate. And what we found is this: That there were indeed several regions of the brain that had more grey matter in the meditators compared to the controls. One of the regions I'm going to point out to you is here in the front of the brain, it's the area that's importantfor working memory and executive decision making and what was interesting about it was when we actually plotted the data versus their ages. So here in the red square, that's the controls. And this is something you see actually, it's been well documented that as we get older, not just there, but across most of our cortex, it actually shrinks as we get older. And this is part of the reason why as we get older, it's harder to figure things out and to remember things.And what was interesting was that in this one region,the 50 year old meditators had the same amount of cortex as the 25 year olds,suggesting that meditation practice may actually slow down or preventthe natural age-related decline in cortical structure.So now, the critics, and there were many critics,said, well, you know, meditators, they're weird.Maybe they were just like that before they started practising, right?A lot of them were vegetarian, so maybe it had something to do with their diet,or something else with their lifestyle, you know.Couldn't possible be the meditation, it's something else, right?And to be fair, you know, that could be true.This first study could not address that.So we did a second study.In this study, what we did is, we took people who had never meditated before,and we put them in the scanner, and then we put them through an eight-week meditation-based stress reduction program where they were told to meditate every day for 30 to 40 minutes .And then we scanned them again at the end of the eight weeks, and this is what we found. So what you see is that several areas became larger. In this slide we can see the hippocampus, and in the graph, the controls are in blue and the meditation subjects are in red, and what we see is that the hippocampus, this is the area that's important for learning and memory, it's also important for emotion regulation and it was interesting it was lessgrey matter in this region in people who had depression and PTSD. Another region we identified was the temporo-parietal junction which is here above your ear, it's important for perspective taking and empathy and compassion. And again, these are both functions which people report changing when they start practising meditation and yoga. Another region we identified was the amygdala. And the amygdala is the fight-or-flight part of your brain. And here we actually found a decrease in gray matter. And what was interesting was that the change in grey matter was correlated with the change in stress. So the more stress reduction people reported, the smaller the amygdala became. And this was really interesting, because it's sort of opposite and parallel of what some animal studies have shown. So colleagues using rodents, they took rodents who were just happy, normal rodents, and they had them in their cage, and they measured their amygdala, and then they put them through a ten- day stress regimen. And at the end of the ten days, they measured their amygdala, and this exact same analogous part of the rat brain grew. So we found a decrease with stress, they found an increase with stress. What was interesting was that then they left the animals alone, and three weeks later they went back and tested them again. And three weeks later, that same part of the amygdala was still large, and the animals, even though they were in their original cages where they were happy, were still acting stressed out, so they, you know, they were cowering in the corner, and they just weren't exploring the space the way they had before. And so, this is the exact opposite of what we saw at the humans, because with the humans nothing has changed with their environment. They still had their stressful jobs, all the difficult problems were still being difficult, and the economy still sucked, but yeah, their amygdala got smaller, and they were reporting less stress. And so, together these really show that the change in the amygdala is not responding to the change in the environment, but rather it's representing the change in the people's reaction or relationship to their environment. And then the other thing that the study shows is that, it wasn't just the people were saying, "Oh, I feel better." Or that it was a placebo response, or that they're trying to please us, but there was actually a neurobiological reason why they're saying they felt less stressed. And so the idea that I'd like to share with all of you today is that meditation can literally change your brain. 'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. I'm a great place for you to tell your story and let your visitors know a little more about you.

 

The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything: Josh Kaufman at TEDx California State University.(Online) Available: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MgBikgcWnY

 

The 10,000 hour rule came out of studies of expert-level performance. There's a professor at Florida State University, his name is K. Anders Ericsson. He is the originator of the 10,00 hour rule. And where that came from is, he studied professional athletes, world class musicians, chess grand masters. All of this ultra competitive folks in ultra-high performing fields. And he tried to figure out how long does it take to get to the top of those kinds of fields. And what he found is, the more deliberate practice, the more time that those individuals spend practicing the elements of whatever it is that they do, the more time you spend, the better you get. And the folks at the tippy top of their fields put in around 10,000 hours of practice. Now, we were talking about the game of telephone a little bit earlier. Here's what happened: an author by the name of Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book in 2007 called "Outliers: The Story of Success", and the central piece of that book was the 10,000 hour rule. Practice a lot, practice well, and you will do extremely well, you will reach the top of your field. So, the message what Dr. Ericsson was actually saying is, it takes 10,000 hours to get at the top of an ultra competitive field in a very narrow subject, that's what that means. But here's what happened: ever since Outliers came out, immediately came out, reached the top of best seller lists, stayed there for three solid months. All of a sudden the 10,000 hour rule was everywhere. And a society-wide game of telephone started to be played. So this message, it takes 10,000 hours to reach the top of an ultra competitive field, became, it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at something, which became, it takes 10,000 hours to become good at something, which became, it takes 10,000 hours to learn something. But that last statement, it takes 10,000 hours to learn something, is not true. It's not true. So, what the research actually says --I spent a lot of time here at the CSU library in the cognitive psychology stacks 'cause I'm a geek. And when you actually look at the studies of skill acquisition,you see over and over a graph like this. Now, researchers, whether they're studying a motor skill, something you do physically or a mental skill, they like to study things that they can time. 'Cause you can quantify that, right? So, they'll give research participants a little task, something that requires physical arrangement, or something that requires learning a little mental trick, and they'll time how long a participant takes to complete the skill. And here's what this graph says, when you start --so when researchers gave participants a task, it took them a really long time, 'cause it was new and they were horrible. With a little bit of practice, they get better and better and better. And that early part of practice is really, really efficient. People get good at things with just a little bit of practice.Now, what's interesting to note is that, for skills that we want to learn for ourselves, we don't care so much about time, right? We just care about how good we are, whatever good happens to mean. So if we relabel performance time to how good you are, the graph flips, and you get his famous and widely known, this is the learning curve. And the story of the learning curve is when you start, you're grossly incompetent and you know it, right? With a little bit of practice, you get really good, really quick. So that early level of improvement is really fast. And then at a certain point you reach a plateau, and the subsequent games become much harder to get, they take more time to get. Now, my question is, I want that, right? How long does it take from starting something and being grossly incompetent and knowing it to being reasonably good? In hopefully, as short a period of time as possible. So, how long does that take? Here's what my research says: 20 hours. That's it. You can go from knowing nothing about any skill that you can think of. Want to learn a language? Want to learn how to draw? Want to learn how to juggle flaming chainsaws? If you put 20 hours of focused deliberate practice into that thing, you will be astounded. Astounded at how good you are. 20 hours is doable, that's about 45 minutes a day for about a month. Even skipping a couple days, here and there. 20 hours isn't that hard to accumulate. Now, there's a method to doing this. Because it's not like you can just start fiddling around for about 20 hours and expect these massive improvements. There's a way to practice intelligently. There's a way to practice efficiently, that will make sure that you invest those 20 hours in the most effective way that you possibly can. And here's the method, it applies to anything: The first is to deconstruct the skill. Decide exactly what you want to be able to do when you're done, and then look into the skill and break it down into smaller pieces. Most of the things that we think of as skills are actually big bundles of skills that require all sorts of different things.The more you can break apart the skill, the more you're able to decide, what are the parts of this skill that would actually help me get to what I want? And then you can practice those first. And if you practice the most important things first, you'll be able to improve your performance in the least amount of time possible. The second is, learn enough to self correct. So, get three to five resources about what it is you're trying to learn. Could be book, could be DVDs, could be courses, could be anything. But don't use those as a way to procrastinate on practice. I know I do this, right? Get like 20 books about the topic, like,"I'm going to start learning how to program a computer when I complete these 20 books". No. That's procrastination. What you want to do is learn just enough that you can actually practice and self correct or self edit as you practice. So the learning becomes a way of getting better at noticing when you're making a mistake and then doing something a little different. The third is to remove barriers to practice. Distractions, television, internet.All of these things that get in the way of you actually sitting down and doing the work. And the more you're able to use just a little bit of willpower to remove the distractions that are keeping you from practicing, the more likely you are to actually sit down and practice, right? And the fourth is to practice for at least 20 hours. Now, most skills have what I call a frustration barrier. You know, the grossly-incompetent- and-knowing-it part? That's really, really frustrating. We don't like to feel stupid. And feeling stupid is a barrier to us actually sitting down and doing the work. So, by pre-committing to practicing whatever it is that you want to do for at least 20 hours, you will be able to overcome that initial frustration barrier and stick with the practice long enough to actually reap the rewards. That's it! It's not rocket science. Four very simple steps that you can use to learn anything. And so it's amazing, pretty much anything that you can think of, what do you want to do. The major barrier to learn something new is not intellectual, it's not the process of you learning a bunch of little tips or tricks or things. The major barrier's emotional. We're scared. Feeling stupid doesn't feel good, in the beginning of learning anything new you feel really stupid. So the major barrier's not intellectual, it's emotional. But put 20 hours into anything. It doesn't matter. What do you want to learn? Do you want to learn a language? Want to learn how to cook? Want to learn how to draw? What turns you on? What lights you up? Go out and do that thing. It only takes 20 hours. Have fun.